Those are the main methods to be aware of. The hopping method works anywhere you’ll be fishing straight down, such as bridges and piers. If fishing out in canals or rivers, it won’t be practical, and drags will really be your only option. If you drag, do it slowly so you’ll feel when there is extra weight. Also, if you pull too quickly, you may keep the magnet off the bottom. Now for some odds and ends advice:
Magnet fishing is more like going treasure hunting in the water than it is like actual fishing. In other words, you won’t catch any fish with this method, unless they are made completely of iron or some other strongly magnetic material. Some treasure hunters throw magnets in lakes and other water ways to attract magnetic metals and pull them up. The hope is that something valuable will surface, but often miscellaneous items like bottle caps and keys are found as well. In fact, strong lifting magnets called magnet retrieval tools are specially designed to retrieve items that are lost at the bottom of bodies of water.
Towns with history are great locations to magnet fish. You can just imagine what sorts of metal treasures have been long discarded from times of industrial development, gold rush, nearby disused munition factories and mines, and areas that were once battlefronts of war. Take the time to visit old towns and drop your magnet to see if you can find a piece of its history. Who knows, your finds may even contribute to the local museum.
The pull of the magnets wasn’t strong enough to pull the object loose from the bottom.  Remember, the pull force you get from a magnet depends on what you’re sticking it to.  A powerful MMS-B-Z0 magnet can pull with hundreds of pounds of force when sticking to a solid steel surface (like the one that holds up a person in this video).  If the steel object is smaller, though, the force could be a lot less.  You won’t see 300 lb of force from the magnet to a paperclip.
I'm glad this magnet is packaged the way it came. A nice cardboard box with a foam insert to hold your magnet in storage AND to keep it away from attaching to any ferrous metal in the vicinity ;-). I haven't magnet fished it yet, but I can tell it will be just what I wanted. Good quality in fit and finish. $35.99 isn't cheap, but this isn't a typical cheap magnet either. I don't think you will be disappointed.

Like any outdoor activity, make sure you take along with you suitable gear to make the most of the experience. At minimum, bring a bucket to carry your finds, a brush to get rid of debris, and wear tough gloves to avoid injury when pulling the rope, and handling sharp and rusted metal. Bring along a small plastic container for storing small items like fishing hooks and lures, nails, and other metal bits. You can add a grappling hook to your gear which will become handy when retrieving heavy items.


Magnet fishing is a very fun hobby gaining new practitioners every day. With a long rope and a powerful magnet, you can make really nice finds. Magnet fishing is a hobby that suits everyone regardless of age or gender. It also has a positive impact on the environment as you pick up things that should not be there, from the bottom of the lakes and channels. It is the perfect blend of treasure hunting and environmental work; a treasure hunt both adults and children will love.
I’ll toss in a quick section on courtesy. Try to keep a distance from other fishermen if they are nearby. Using the hop method, you won’t be disturbing the water too much, but if you throw and drag, that’ll scare away fish. If you find some lures or extra tools, it never hurts to offer some of them to fishermen. There are few to no laws concerning magnet fishing, and if we are good stewards to our environment and others, it’ll hopefully stay that way.
I’ll toss in a quick section on courtesy. Try to keep a distance from other fishermen if they are nearby. Using the hop method, you won’t be disturbing the water too much, but if you throw and drag, that’ll scare away fish. If you find some lures or extra tools, it never hurts to offer some of them to fishermen. There are few to no laws concerning magnet fishing, and if we are good stewards to our environment and others, it’ll hopefully stay that way.
Gave it a two because the magnet was great the five casts we got with it. Gave as a Christmas gift and finally warmed up enough to use it and all was fine until the 6th cast. The eye bolt broke off about two or three threads down into the body. Wasn't caught on anything or pulling anything heavy--No bind or anything and was only attached to an old metal milk crate that we could see from the bank. We were able to wade out and retrieve the body of the magnet but it is now useless as I see no way of getting the broken threads out. It is a clean break straight across the threaded part of the eyebolt--no bending or anything. Still using the smaller one that we ordered at the same time and have no problems out of it. same company, etc.
×