He's talking about the towing rating of the truck. The hitch is what it is. If you have the Toyota tow package (at least on my 2008) you got a class IV hitch, which is rated to 10,000 lbs towing, 1,000 tongue weight. That's because the truck is rated to tow 6,500 lbs. So they couldn't use a class III hitch, which is rated to 6,000 lbs, 600 tongue weight.
There's no guarantee that the hitch rating is the same as the truck's tow rating. The base truck is rated for 3,500 lbs so it's possible someone puts on even as low as a class II hitch, which is 3,500 lbs rated. So you just have to know what everything is designed for. I'm not sure you can say the tow point could actually handle 10,000 lbs. Perhaps it's the frame that gives up at 6,500 lbs so trying to use 10,000 lbs in the hitch would mean the hitch itself would stay intact but pull the frame apart. It's maybe due to brakes, not exceeding the weight of the truck itself too much, stability. But that's all speculation. All you can say is you know 6,500 lbs is fine.
Somebody mentioned the truck weight but keep in mind that just truck weight is fine if pulling on pavement with no incline. Pulling up hill means working against gravity. But you will most likely not need to pull yourself out of a mall parking spot and much more pulling power will be needed to get yanked out of mud, which is a much more likely possibility.
Use this heavy-duty, hitch-mounted shackle as an attachment point for strap, cable, or rope. Powder coated steel resists rust. Hitch pin and clip sold separately. Features: Tow ring lets you attach recovery strap, cable, or rope (sold separately) to be used in agricultural, industrial, or recreational applications Hitch-mounted design ensures quick, simple
This is a great tow hitch to consider purchasing if you are already the owner of a ball mount and need a little extra kick to your towing capacity. As we all know, shackle hitches tend to carry a little more weight than their ball mount counterparts. This is why many will consider them to be the best truck hitches for towing. Since this one in particular comes with resistance to rust, thanks to its rugged powder coating, it is also guaranteed to last a longer time than one without these protections.
From that center one, we're looking at 1-1/2". Then from the one that's closest to the shackle. That's going to give us a measurement of 2-1/4". Now, if we take a measurement from the center of those hitch pinholes to the back of the shackle, the closest point, there, of the shackle . the closest pinhole to the shackle is going to be 1". That center one, right here up top, that's going to be 1-3/4, and to the very back pinhole, that's going to be about 2-1/2". Pretty simple installation. You'll need to determine which way you want this positioned in your hitch. Slide this piece into the receiver opening of the hitch and then secure it in your hitch using a hitch pin and clip or hitch lock. That's going to do it for today's look at part number BDW20239.
Solid, heavy, very thick coating. Look like they will hold up as advertized although I haven't had a chance to use them yet. Fit and finish is at least as good as higher-priced shackles I've seen at my local S&M Bondage store and I think they'll go well with that early 20th century farmhouse basement steam radiator theme or in any safe house as well. Finding chain and manacles to match might be a chore, but look around.
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