I wonder if that's just theoretical or if it has actually happened though. Hitch pins are so thick I have a hard time picturing one actually bending much less breaking, with the normal loads of recovery.. especially with the elastic recovery strap. Also though, even if it breaks, wouldn't the pin just stay in the reciever while the strap flies out?
Partially this is so that I can snug everything down and prevent the pin/bolt from vibrating and rotating. With a lock washer the bolt is nice and tight, no movement or rotation to wear anything. I also feel better that the bolt has washers and shoulders for a little more resistance to deflecting or the receiver trying to spread or twist. I just don't like that hitch pins can move around so much.

A shackle hitch receiver is the perfect tow hitch for the recreational off-roader or when you need to tow in a pinch. They fit in most 2” receivers to give you the pulling power you need to tow. The extensive selection at 4 Wheel Parts has everything you need to outfit a recovery kit for the hard-core enthusiast or simply have some better safety gear for your truck. Be prepared with heavy-duty receivers, straps and winches.


I honestly didn’t have too high of expectations when purchasing this product as the cost was a lot easier on the wallet than local farm supply stores. That being said, this thing has a beautiful fit and finish. The ability to have the shackle mounted sideways, keeps from damaging your rope from pinch points. This thing is a solid chunk of steel. I’m not entirely sure that it is possible to damage this hitch on a full size truck. The hitch pin or shackle will fail way before the receiver will. Make sure you use this thing as it is intended because if you manage to rip this off, it is going to take armor plating to stop this thing in a projectile state. It is SOLID! Also, buy a locking hitch pin. Someone would definitely steal this if they have the chance.

I went out to the warehouse to take a look at the Bulldog Winch Receiver Mount with Shackle # BDW20186 referenced in your question. The pin hole that the shackle mounts to has a diameter of right at 1 inch. As you already mentioned, the shackle itself has a 7/8 inch diameter and the shank is a 2-1/2 inch x 2-1/2 inch, Class V receiver mount. This is a really nice, heavy duty mount that has a break strength of 78,000 pounds and a working load limit of 13,000 pounds. I have also attached...
Searching high and low for that d ring hitch for your truck or jeep? You found the right mini guide to help you narrow down the four best d ring receiver hitch. After a day of navigating the off road trail and getting stuck, maybe you’re looking for another pull point for your winch. Or just want to look cool while you are cruising through the parking lot with your mall crawler Jeep build. Regardless the reason for your tow hitch shackle, we can help you figure out which one will fit you best. Most of these tow hitch shackles are very similar in looks, tow capacity and price. Some come with d ring isolators and others come in different colors. What is cool is these things pop in under five minutes. At the end of the day you can have one under 40 bucks! 
Love the Bulldog winch 3/4" ×1-1/4 shackle. Its very strong, works & looks great, on my Scrambler 1K. I've had the bulldog for over a year now and it has not let me down. I had a difificult time finding a shackle of this size and quality here in Canada. Until I came across etailer.com. I would definitely recommend this shackle for any atv/utv with a 1-1/4 hitch. I need to get 2 more for the RzR & Ace and for me it's a no brainer where I'll be ordering again from etrailer.com made easy. Thanks 547879
Heavy, solid, and it fits the 2″x2″ receiver perfectly. A 5/8″ locking hitch pin is now needed. Has to be a locking type because this shackle is so attractive a thief could hardly pass it up. In doing research, I found that hitch pins come in different lengths; I had bought one that was a bit too short to pass through the holes in my Toyota Tacoma receiver, which has 1/2″ thick walls. So beware.
He's talking about the towing rating of the truck. The hitch is what it is. If you have the Toyota tow package (at least on my 2008) you got a class IV hitch, which is rated to 10,000 lbs towing, 1,000 tongue weight. That's because the truck is rated to tow 6,500 lbs. So they couldn't use a class III hitch, which is rated to 6,000 lbs, 600 tongue weight.
Heavy, solid, and it fits the 2″x2″ receiver perfectly. A 5/8″ locking hitch pin is now needed. Has to be a locking type because this shackle is so attractive a thief could hardly pass it up. In doing research, I found that hitch pins come in different lengths; I had bought one that was a bit too short to pass through the holes in my Toyota Tacoma receiver, which has 1/2″ thick walls. So beware.
Every off-road vehicle breaks down from time to time. If you don't want to have a bolted-on tow hook on your off-roader, a D-ring hitch placed in your receiver will provide the high-powered towing you need. You can keep them in all the time like a regular ball hitch receiver or simply have it available when needed. Tow your new rig to your house or the shop or simply have it on hand as part of your recovery kit. Tow straps easily work with the tow hitch shackle. Simply unscrew the bolt then place the loop of the strap and bolt back together. Hand tightening should be all that you need to do to keep the strap in place. Don't turn the shackle when towing because you could bend the metal. Keep the tow strap on the flat part of the D-ring and keep you and your vehicle safe.

Another safety note is to weigh down the strap or winch cable, (especially a winch cable.) The reason is that if it was to snap the ends would whip around violently, injuring anyone in their way. A heavy blanket thrown over the strap or cable will do the job. Alternatively, if your recovery accessories come in a handy bag, fill it with something heavy and suspend it from the strap.


Just a few measurements we're going to go over real quick starting with the overall length, from very back to the front with the shackle extended out. That's going to give us a measurement of about 11 and a half inches. If we measured just the mount portion without the shackle, that's going to give us a measurement of about 8 inches. Really simple installation. This portion right here is going to be the portion that slides into your 2 and a half inch by 2 and a half inch trailer hitch receiver. You're going to push it in until you get your pin holes lined up with one another in whatever configuration that you want to use this.
Assume the whole bar is well attached to the frame rails at each side (otherwise, it's definitely not good for a snatch recovery!). There is a huge difference between pulling on the receiver mount in the middle of the cross-bar, and pulling with a long harness attached to both ends. The direct receiver-mount pull will tend to bend the cross bar outwards, and pull the frame rails in towards each other (with a lot of leverage, on top of the many tons of force imparted by a snatch recovery).
That's going to allow for easy and quick connect and disconnect of the recovery strap . Now, this is going to be great for ATVs and UTVs that have an 1-1/4" hitch on it. It is going to require a 1/2" hitch pin and clip or lock to get it secured into the hitch. That item is sold separately. You can find those right here at etrailer.com. A few measurements to go over with you real quick.

I honestly didn’t have too high of expectations when purchasing this product as the cost was a lot easier on the wallet than local farm supply stores. That being said, this thing has a beautiful fit and finish. The ability to have the shackle mounted sideways, keeps from damaging your rope from pinch points. This thing is a solid chunk of steel. I’m not entirely sure that it is possible to damage this hitch on a full size truck. The hitch pin or shackle will fail way before the receiver will. Make sure you use this thing as it is intended because if you manage to rip this off, it is going to take armor plating to stop this thing in a projectile state. It is SOLID! Also, buy a locking hitch pin. Someone would definitely steal this if they have the chance.

With the Grip recovery strap mentioned above, it is a pretty stiff pull/ yank. With nylon, you are supposed to have a much softer yank. When you go from 0-20 and pull someone out, it tends to bounce everything around quite a bit. Then repeat this about 10 times in a day. Yeah, we have been there. The softer and easier you can get those pulls, the easier it is on everything, your back, your 4Runner, and the driver of the other truck.
I’ve had this 20 ft strap combo for about 10 months now just in case I ever needed it. I was waiting till I actually used it to give it a review. I used it today to pull my brothers lifted f250 with it. The shackle was real heavy duty and easy to take the hitch off and put the shackle in. It gives you that peace of mind that it won’t come off the ball hitch. The Strap is built tough and durable. I do like the double loop ends on the strap because I feel like that’s sturdier than the metal hooks straps. It was actually my first time pulling a vehicle with my truck and the 20 ft strap was actually plenty long for the speeds we went. We had our phones on and constantly communicating so we could be on the same page when breaking. I traveled 3 miles pulling a heavy f250 at no more than about 35-40 mph. The 20 ft strap was plenty room for braking at that speed and enough to give u peace of mind of not feeling like the vehicle your pulling is gonna slam into you. I like the bag to keep everything in. Mine fits perfect underneath the back seats of my ram. Great buy. Pulling my brothers truck one time paid for itself in not having to get a tow truck.
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