Consumer Reports is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to helping consumers. We make it easy to buy the right product from a variety of retailers. Clicking a retailer link will take you to that retailer’s website to shop. When you shop through retailer links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission – 100% of the fees we collect are used to support our mission. Learn more. Our service is unbiased: retailers can’t influence placement. All prices are subject to change.

im pretty much fed up with life. school was such a drag, and i’ve just been ITCHING to be free. i’ve got a bunch of books i want to read. I’ve got a bit of savings to pay for food. a portable propane stove. figure i’ll wash clothes at a laundramat or in a bucket. it would be great to just find a hassle free place, to just live, read, meditate…find myself. shower could be a problem. i figured i could just find a local gym, and go there morning and night; but then I worry about finding a good place to sleep. i swear i’m alergic to cops knocking on my window in the middle of the night. i wonder if it’ll ever get too hot in my van all closed up. maybe i’ll have to get a battery powered fan, i’m not trying to mess with any complicated stuff to extract electricity out of my car battery that might drain it.
While wearing a seat belt can reduce the likelihood of a severe liver injury by 21 percent, it cannot prevent a negligent or dangerous driver from causing a catastrophic car accident on the road. People who have been injured in a car crash may choose to work with a personal injury lawyer to pursue compensation for the damages they have suffered, including costly medical bills, lost wages and pain and suffering.

This sounds entirely redundant. The whole point of having money is to spend it on something that increases your quality of living. Why live in a completely shitty living condition just to stockpile cash in a bank acount that you'll never spend on something that actually improves your standard of living, such as a nice apartment or more expansive wardrobe?
It turns out that living in a VW Passat is tricky at first. Four walls and a roof over my head, yes, but no tea and coffee facilities to speak of. When people find out about my lifestyle, they ask the same three questions. Where do you sleep? Where do you park? Where do you shower? Only women ask about where you go to the toilet. First things first, I got hold of a travel kettle that plugs into the cigarette lighter. Next I sorted out the sleeping arrangements. It took a while to perfect, but sliding forward the two front seats reveals what I call the back-seat bedroom. The problem of comfort and interior decor was solved with a bean bag behind the driver's seat, pillows to level out the back bench, bungee ropes, gardening wire, torches and some fetching bed linen.
Snacks/ Food: It is important to always have some sort of food in your car. Preferably on the floor on the passenger seat side as I did. I used that section for my food. It was easy when I got hungry, I could just reach over and grab a banana to eat when I needed it. It’s crucial to always have at least some stuff ready to eat anytime you may need it. Not eating can cause many problems. There were many times after work I was extremely hungry and was leaving work and had a piece of fruit I reached for and ate right from my car.
Yes, so long as you park your home-slash-car in an authorised area. Get yourself to a dedicated gypsy site or get permission from a private land owner and you’ll be fine, in theory. The sites we spoke to said they wouldn’t consider taking on a person living in a car (even a flash one) but you may have better luck, especially if you can convince the owner you’ll take them for a spin in your Ferrari-cum-bedroom every day. The question of whether sleeping in a car is preferable to sticking around at home is wholly subjective, but having looked into it, we’re erring on the side of bricks and mortar.
CCarson hot springs resort call if ever… they have no utilitiy bills buy all youu need or theres freebies also some,through salvation army etc thrift stores there, buy all furniture yourself etc…. but! 350.00 yep a month rooms with bathroom set up like cottages, avoid drinking etc neighbors, see who ones neighbor is ist[too nopisy otherwise. but plenty i dfound were good neighbors…. so 350 a month bathroom in large rooms, thats it, ouit the back windiows Geez! lovely you see a hill i rock hound, no view butnature from the bathroom windows………….. so nearby on the way to Dayton Nevada a few miles east from Carson City, park camp overnight i did it all the time just wash car lol once and awhile if ever a cop comes through, never happerned to me in 10 yrs…so far of going up adventuring there,hot summer but many ideas helped me… But i moved my car sometimes, and found accross from the turn off one sees the dump sign,ahead a few yards on the left is where i pulled off wow found a gravel road amidst a sign, old that says be careful old mine[s] [past and theres none right there…. further description of location? Just ask…….. but i d drive what goes down a little on the gravel road,nothing on
Church parking lots i feel the safest because very rarely nobody bothers cars, you’ll need to talk to the church people because some but not all will not allow it but most understand, im a religious person as well and feel im in the watchful eye of God as well. There are police that many times will drive through and nice enough to see how im doing, also the police in my area explained to me that the majority of them will leave you alone unless they get a complaint about you sleeping therets just that they have to do their duty and have you leave
Yes, so long as you park your home-slash-car in an authorised area. Get yourself to a dedicated gypsy site or get permission from a private land owner and you’ll be fine, in theory. The sites we spoke to said they wouldn’t consider taking on a person living in a car (even a flash one) but you may have better luck, especially if you can convince the owner you’ll take them for a spin in your Ferrari-cum-bedroom every day. The question of whether sleeping in a car is preferable to sticking around at home is wholly subjective, but having looked into it, we’re erring on the side of bricks and mortar.
Find a suitable car. You can only live in your car successfully if your car works. If you have any lead time and see the writing on the wall ahead of time, get a van; ideally a windowless delivery van of some sort: you will have room under your platform bunk for storage, you can install a rooftop skylight/hatch for air, a rooftop rack for storage and even look out when the skylight is open. An anonymous looking white Chevy van, or Holden panel van in Australia makes concealment a lot easier. You're going to need a new or "newish" car or be a good mechanic to live in an older car. If you have an old car keep in mind that you're liable to break down at an inopportune moment if you don't stay on top of maintenance.

I’ve been living in my car for 22 months so far and it has been a pretty interesting experience. I started doing this because I was about 2k in debt and had trashed my credit to the point where I felt I probably wouldn’t be able to move into a nice apartment. My goal was to pay off my debts and have enough money to start over again. I paid back all I had owed in a little over 2 months, but decided that I needed to have a little bit of money in the bank before trying to put my life back together, something like 2k. I would eat a loaf of bread a day and drove my car as little as possible to cut my expenses. I really was so frugal, but it had paid off, I had reached my goal, saved up 2k and could move into an apartment now. But I looked at my life and it was 100% better than it was when I was living with my ex. I was happy, I wasn’t drinking anymore, I had time to think about what I really wanted, and the more I thought about it, the less I wanted my old life. So I stayed in my car and continued just throwing money in the bank and living frugally. Since the first day I moved into my car, I have learned how to play guitar and harmonica, built a website learned how to program in HTML, CSS, Javascript, and some PHP, traveled a ton, and read classic books that I should have but never did when I was younger. It has been almost 2 years and I have been able to save almost 30k working at a low wage part time in retail. I have never been happier in my life, and I still eat a loaf of bread a day.


There are also several options for food storage and personal kitchen conversions if you have the vehicle (and the coin) to get them custom fitted and installed. If not, we suggest keeping a rugged cooler stocked with your perishable items, dry storage for non-perishables and keeping an eye out for the next campsite where you can set up camp, get a warm fire going, and cook yourself a hot meal under the stars. It’s why you decided upon this lifestyle in the first place right?
You’ll probably want to take a camping stove and propane with you, and you may even have room for a two-burner stove, but chances are you won’t be cooking up many gourmet meals while on the road. It’s great to have some go-to options like oatmeal, instant mashed potatoes, and even things that require no prep like canned Chef Boyardee ravioli, applesauce, pop tarts, and granola bars.
Singapore allows deductions from your income to purchase a home. There is insurance on your home, so if you are ill, the house payments would still be paid,and you can repay once you are back at work. Murderers and drug dealers are hung on Friday morning. They fine you for tossing trash on the streets, and you pay to get a permit to drive a car in the thousands. Your car cannot be junk, for they have an excellent public transportation system. They avoided 9-11-01 in their country by paying attention and not worrying about stains on a blue dress. They have excellent healthcare, and you do not go broke paying for medical services. I wish I could live there,but they have very STRICT immigration laws, that you better obey!

There were some precautions though. Cooking inside the car was not a good idea. There is the danger of finding a stable place to cook. The danger of setting things alight. The danger of carbon monoxide, and the smell of cooked food in the car. Cooking is for outside of the car. There's normally no issue with setting the stove on the boot / trunk of the car and cooking there. If your boot slopes, any stable flat surface will do. After cooking, allow the stove time to cool down before packing it away. If you don't cook regularly, remove the gas / fuel container between uses.

Now, I’m dithering between buying a box van or a full-size passenger van. I’ve read that box vans (even converted ones) aren’t exactly welcome at campgrounds, even if they’re self-contained? OTOH, campgrounds ARE expensive but, would be good to be ABLE to use one when need arises. Either way, I plan to have a little gas-powered scooter in/on the thing.
Increased hepatic glucose production is a major contributor to hyperglycemia in T2D. The hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies show that CAR activation markedly improves insulin sensitivity and decreases hepatic glucose production in the ob/ob mice. In accord with this, and also with both earlier studies of PB effects on enzyme activities (8) and more recent studies (12, 14), TC treatment suppresses expression of the key gluconeogenic genes PEPCK and G6P. CAR also induces important genes in glucose uptake (hexokinase), and also utilization via the pentose phosphate pathway (PGD), which supports drug metabolism by generating NADPH, an obligate cofactor for cytochrome P450 reductase. Outside of the context of the xenobiotic response, activation of the pentose phosphate shunt has also been suggested to contribute to the suppression of hyperglycemia by PPARδ activation (25).
This may be the most challenging element of car living: how do we keep clean and answer nature’s call? Where do we access toilets, running water, and showering facilities? Some long-term car-livers choose to maintain a gym membership for the daily showering benefits — this is a pricey if luxurious solution. If you go that route, try to choose one that includes towel service: drying wet towels in the car can create moisture and mildew problems.
Cut cardboard exactly the size off your windows and spray paint em black on the side that faces out the windows. This works great if you have partially tinted windows. You want to face your car so the front is on the least likely side to be viewed. For the windshield I recommend reflectix because many people have windshield covers so this is inconspicuous. (can be bought at most hardware stores)
If you’re doing a full build-out, you’ll probably put a lot of thought into your bed since that’s where you’ll likely spend the most time inside (besides the driver’s seat). Your sleeping system can also be as simple as folding down or removing the seats and inflating a luxurious sleeping pad. Pair that with a down quilt and you’ll be good to go. Looking for a quick and easy solution that doesn’t take up much space? Check out the Therm-a-Rest NeoAir Dream and a Rumpl Down Puffy Blanket. Together, they won’t take up more than a few liters of space yet will provide a great amount of comfort and warmth.
If you can't afford a porta potti there are other options. A basic bucket half filled with water and detergent will serve as a potti. It will smell though. A layer of oil on top of the water will help keep the smell down. But that can be messy. You can use a bucket filled with sand, but that gets smelly too. A bucket filled with kitty litter works pretty good. You can pee into bottles, Gatorade bottles do well.
im gonna be living out of my mini-van for awhile. just graduated college and dont feel like going into the work world right away. just wanna drive around, travel, explore. i hate running into cops. For awhile I didn’t have internet in my house, so I would drive around to the nearest public place to surf the web. This led me to have so many run ins with cops. hate it. i can’t imagine how hard it’ll be to avoid cops when i’m living out of your van. I’m planning on going to the southern tip of florida in order to be in the warmest place possible for the winter. I wonder if it will still get too cold there at night during january?
There are also several options for food storage and personal kitchen conversions if you have the vehicle (and the coin) to get them custom fitted and installed. If not, we suggest keeping a rugged cooler stocked with your perishable items, dry storage for non-perishables and keeping an eye out for the next campsite where you can set up camp, get a warm fire going, and cook yourself a hot meal under the stars. It’s why you decided upon this lifestyle in the first place right?
The police officer will most likely ask you what you are doing there, and Odom advises to explain that you drove a long way that day and you wanted to rest so that you don't get in an accident. The officer may tell you to move on because it's illegal to sleep there, or if you're lucky, he might "hint" that he won't be returning to the area that night, in which case you can go back to sleep. 
The vehicle I live out of during the colder months when the camp goes through it’s seasonal weather anomalies is a 2001 GMC cube van. It has a ten foot fiberglass box with a counter and a bench. I put my folding cot in the middle and sleep comfortably. My useful necessities are in plastic boxes, I cook at parks, I sleep in a double sleeping bag, have a sawdust bucket for a toilet, a cooler for food . I get ice frozen at a fridge in a local college I attend, and take showers at friends homes. It’s a tough life and sometimes you have to be patient about many challenges but it is a good way to keep expenses low or not have to work as many hours. I was able to pay my land off in eight years. Sometimes I wish I had a house but then remember the stress I was under always having to get the mortgage money up. Someday I will build my little cabin, have already experimented building natural buildings like small domes, underground root cellars, greenhouses. Now the financial stress has been reduced . I don’t get SSI or other income, but because of this lifestyle I can work less than part time while going to school full-time. My life without stress from the monetary needs is more stable and relaxed. If well-planned out, it could almost be satisfying, unlike other lifestyles. And I am growing an edible perrenniel garden at the camp, picking my own apples, plums, hazelnuts, vegetables, every year. It’s been a rugged lifestyle but it shows what you are made of. (BTW, I’m a woman in my late fifties, it has kept me very fit. I can outwalk, out hike, out roller blade people half my age).
Location also plays a role in being able to boondock for long periods of time. The western U.S. has considerably more boondocking opportunities than does the eastern U.S. While there are certainly some places in the eastern U.S. where a car dweller can boondock, the options are much more limited. Anyone planning to boondock while living in a vehicle would do well to consider positioning in the western U.S. if at all possible.
You have made an argument where there doesn’t need to be one. All she did was ask for advise. She didn’t ask to be judged for her comment. Not many people would like to find out that their husband or wife doesn’t mind living in a filthy place with farm animals and tools. The Christian comment seemed to me to be for those of us that would tell her to leave the dirty bastard. That’s no way to live for anyone, Christian or otherwise.

heating pads, two or three, that people use for muscle aches. they only draw out 50 watts each. you can get a 100 watt inverter to plug into your cigareet lighter. but usually these heat pads are designed with an automatic shut off after an hour. so try to find ones that don’t. ask the pharmacist. go online. inverter is about $20 and a heat pad about $13. try to find a salvage store or liquidation/outlet store.

You will need to disconnect the batteries from the car when you are using your marine deep cycle batteries. Because when they are still connected to the car, and the car is off and you are running devices from those batteries, it is still connected to the car battery – you are draining your car battery and could loose it. So you need to get under the hood when your car is off and you intend on using the marine batteries. You need to get under the hood to disconnect that cable. I have a clamp on the end of the RED, the positive, cable, So I just unclamp it from the car, I go under the hood and unclamp it.
You get food very hot without running your car. You can get any kind of food very hot in a heat pad ($12) powered by a small inverter ($10). You can get 2-3 cans of food in a regular size heat pad. No going under the hood, exploding cans, melted containers, burnt skin, or waiting for the food to cool. You can use any container in a heat pad and get it very hot. You can take a water tight container, like a good zip lock bag, put food in it and heat it in the heat pad. It takes about 20-25 minutes on high – this should not kill or drain a good large car battery, just make sure that you charge the battery soon after using the battery like this. I use rubber bands to wrap the heat pad all around the container. Of course this requires an inverter. The heat pad is only 50 watts, so the smallest plug-in inverter will work. Heat pads are designed to transfer heat so they get cool or cold VERY fast too, a minute after they are shut off. So wrap the heat pad with the food in a thick sweater, towel, or stuff it under a pillow. It will heat up faster and STAY very warm.
That’s a good, thoughtful question, Jean. I have some consumer debt to pay off then my only debt will be student loans. I expect to pay off the consumer debt well before next spring. So, my goal is that by next spring, I will have a new apartment and get my dog back (my family has been keeping him for me in another state). I will recreate my budget with more balance (like saving more for retirement). I may even quit the second job and spend more time developing my teaching materials to sell online, or researching and writing about how to help kids read better.
Those survival blankets? the ones that look like aluminium foil? they are good. It takes a lot to rip them, they are cheap and take up hardly any room in a pack. If you are in a tent or a hammock wrap yourself in one of those emergency blankets and then get into your sleeping bag. Socks, hat, gloves. If you choose a hammock, get one without a space bar and made of parachute nylon which folds up small, Ticket to the Moon makes a good one, buy a double size and sleep in it diagonally, that way your body will be flat and not like a banana. Hennessey is good too. Maybe tape another foil blanket to the surface of your hammock underneath. If you put the foil between hammock and sleeping bag it gets all scrunched up. good luck. If your pool showers have cubicles you can shave and clean teeth in the shower where no one will see.
Hey, my husband and I have a second home. We started out with an apartment. Worked overseas and saved money for a house. Continued to work overseas, saved money and found out that we needed a tax shelter. If we didn’t get the second house we would continue to pay crazy taxes. We let family and friends stay in our house and I don’t feel a bit bad or greedy. We work our butts off, pay high taxes, save for our future and don’t depend on the government for any a dime.

Nicole Cutler, L.Ac., MTCM is a long time advocate of integrating perspectives on health. With a Bachelor's degree in Neuroscience from the University of Rochester and a Master's degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine from Five Branches Institute, Nicole has been a licensed acupuncturist since 2000. She has gathered acupuncture licenses in the states of California and New York, is a certified specialist with the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association, has earned diplomat status with the National Commission of Chinese and Oriental Medicine in Acupuncture and Chinese Herbology and is a member of the Society for Integrative Oncology. In addition to her acupuncture practice that focuses on stress and pain relief, digestion, immunity and oncology, Nicole contributes to the integration of healthcare by writing articles for professional massage therapists and people living with liver disease.


I understand what you are saying. I have thought about this and have decided to try the hotel parking lots. Not many police go through those (at least, not the nicer ones) and I would park in back. As far as dealing with police, I would just tell them, I am temporarily sleeping in my car for a set amount of time. I have to be honest. I don’t know how anyone could sleep in a Wamart parking lot, too much noise and activity. Hotel parking seems the most logical, safe, quiet place to be.
I responded to this idea several comments above, please read that entire response with other valuable information. Pet warmers do not heat on 6 watts. That is stated as the continual wattage consumption on pet warmers because they have a device on them, that stays on continually, that you cannot turn off. Since you cannot turn it off, it has to state upfront that the continual wattage use is 6 watts. That device is always on so it can detect when a pet has walked on it and stays there. When it detects weight staying on it, then it turns the heat on.
For one, you could get a lot of sheer very see through white fabric (that allows the air to move easily through it) and make a tent around your van using the nearby trees or putting up some poles, but that would take some money. They sell these at stores that they sell fabric in, like Wal Mart, for $1 a yard, but you would need a lot to go aruond your vehicle and then some living space around your vehicle. If you were to buy some kind of large ready canopy tent to put over and around your vehicle and living space and then add some fabric walls to it, it would probably cost over $200.
yes their are easier ways to heat your car/truck/SUV and van. 1 of them would be a heater but that would take alot out of your electrical system in your car. I’ve been doing research on every avenue for living in your car. For me i was very lucky when i bought my 97′ Ford Expedition (full size/4×4/fully loaded/leather with a 40/60 back seat) and yes it’s by choice to move into my suv.. If you can afford it, buy an isolator so you will be able to run your main battery plus a back-up battery. You will want to look into a different type of battery as well but it will work in your favour in the long run. you will want to change your batteries to what called agm, the battery isolator is so that you can run a 2nd battery and best part is that you can charge the 2nd battery when you go from point A-B. I figure that what i pay in rental/bills i can live off and be able to bank the rest. I bought the expedition for work, at the time i was working comercial construction. So i needed the full size bc i was the only one on the crew with my drivers and i found the Expedition was a very representible suv. which in my case it fit everyone on the crew, 1 plus 4 😉 march 1-2014 i’ll be moving into my 97′ Ford expedition suv. oh if you are looking into heating up your car, look into a full size “heated pet blanket” they are reasonably cheap and will only turn on when your sitting or laying on them. they take only 6 watts of power so it wont even be that much.

It’s tempting to rely on fast food and restaurants when we don’t have the comfort of our own kitchens. Unfortunately, not only will that get expensive, but your health can begin to suffer from too much restaurant food. If you must, you can experiment with using your car engine to cook sealed packets of food, but the rest of us may prefer to keep it simple. A non-leaking cooler with working drainage helps you eat fresh, but you’ll need to focus on nonperishables as much as possible. Keep it simple, buying sturdy fruits and vegetables (citrus, apples, carrots, cucumbers and celery store reasonably well; lettuce and strawberries need to be eaten right away), nut butters and crackers, dry cereal, canned soups and beans. Cheese, bread, eggs, butter, and long-life tetrapacks of milk or non-dairy “milks” can last well in your cooler.
Living in a car is legal if it’s parked in your driveway or if the owner of the private property where you have parked your vehicle has given you permission to do so. But a private lot owner, such as the owner of a grocery store or shopping mall, can have the person arrested for trespassing if they spend too much time off of the road and in the lot.

Tires are the only part of your car that touches the road. And they’re especially important when logging tons of miles, particularly when those miles are on dirt or gravel roads or in extreme weather. Tires that come stock on most vehicles are usually garbage and underperform in virtually all road conditions. Instead of refitting the stock rubber when it wears out, upgrade to something more suited for the road less traveled. Upgrades are often cheaper than the tires your van came with.


I'm thinking that this set-up will allow me to have an absurd amount of extra money compared to other incoming analysts. I figure, if I am barely going to spend any time in my apartment anyway, and will probably be too tired to pursue girls or hang out with friends very often in the limited time typical of analyst stints, I might as well save some money while I'm at it. And just because I don't have my own apartment certainly doesn't mean I wouldn't be able to go out for drinks after work. What do people think of this? How common is this?
Blackout curtains are an effective way to provide privacy. Black fleece is probably the most popular option for blackout curtains, but other fabrics can be used as well. Blackout curtains are particularly effective when used behind tinted windows as it just looks like the windows are very dark. Curtains are also essential if you plan to use electronics or lighting at night as the glow will still show though tinted windows.
Beside feeling terribly guilty about wanting to do this, there are other challenges I foresee and things I know that will not be easy. Florida is terribly hot at night in the summers and mosquitos are unbearable. One technical challenge I hope EV cars of the next few years embrace is battery use while the car is turned off or charging. EV cars of tomorrow can keep a car cool overnight for under 15% of the total battery! That will only get better. However, their systems tend to not allow you to cool the cab while they are off or charging. Some Tesla owners have found hacks to solve this, but manufactures have so far not seen any reason to incorporate such features.
Tiny homes can range from about 100 to 300 square feet and cost between $25,000 to $100,000, give or take. Stephens and Parsons built theirs using reclaimed material for about $20,000, and it comes with a loft for a queen-sized bed, a compost toilet, walls that double as storage, and shelves that turn into tables. For those with more lavish tastes, vendors like Seattle Tiny Homes offer customizable houses – complete with a shower and a washer and dryer – for about $85,000.
a. Organize, organize, organize! Have a place for everything and keep everything in its place. In addition to your sleeping items, you will need a carry-on style suitcase for clothes, a laundry bag for clothes pending a trip to the laundry (with air freshener), a “chuck box” (your car camping kitchen supplies), water storage container and a cup/water bottle, a tool box, a briefcase organizer for paperwork, a box with your camping supplies, a toiletry case (with towel, washcloths, shampoo, soap/shower gel, hairbrush, other hygiene supplies), flashlight/LED lamp and candles.

Finally, make sure that while your basic life needs are being met, you’re also staying safe both on the road and off of it. Keep your vehicle in good repair. Park in safe places where you’re not alone. Organize your car so that it isn’t obviously you live on the road, otherwise thieves are more likely to break in when you’re away. Make sure that someone knows where you are and how to get in contact with you, and that you have the means to contact someone if you need help.
3. Do not park, ready to bed down for the night, until after 11 pm, as people usually don’t go to sleep until that time or later. When I pull into a spot. I sit real still and survey the area. Is anyone looking? Can I bed down safely? Is anyone peering out their windows at me. If anyone is seen in 5 minutes of sitting real still in the drivers seat, I leave and find a new place.

I spoke with a nutritionist prior to starting this adventure. Lundberg whole grain microwavable rice, which can be cooked after purchasing it at the grocery. There are a number of ways to store food in the car. I have a soft sided cooler, and a grocery bag full of nuts, and other dried foods. I am going to start purchasing food from the local farms, which can be stored in a hardshell cooler. it only needs to be kept cool.
Another core idea is to live “out of” the car rather than “in” the car. Spending all of your time in a small space can be claustrophobic. Sleeping (and possibly working) in a car while you spend the remainder of your time outdoors is much easier to manage. In my case, I slept and worked in the car (I am a digital nomad), but otherwise spent as much time outdoors as possible.
8. Law enforcement encounters: should be a no brainer, Be respectful, compliant, and, if you followed the above, they will be respectful to you for being” Clean, Quite, and Low Key”. One may need state that as their intent. In short, you don’t want them to haul you away, and you don’t want them to have reason to come pay you a visit when they have some down time.
Need 3: Hygiene. You’ll need to find somewhere to bathe. That means washing up and brushing your teeth every day and showering as often as possible. The standard suggestion for this is a gym membership, which is a great idea if you can swing it; other possibilities are truck stops (many of which have showers) and state parks. If you have access to public campgrounds that will meet all of these needs, but they’re often expensive. In any case, you need to solve this problem — neglecting your hygiene will make every other aspect of your life a lot harder.
Needless to say, places with “free wifi” do me no good, and sleeping near a cell tower does not work too well. BTW, I go home during the day and spend as much time I can there before feeling too bad to stay. Then, I drive to a park or lot and bring things to do. The utilities have refused to replace their smart meters with the old, safe ones even if you have a letter from your doctor, or a legislator tries to intercede. As I said, they are creating much suffering and a whole new group of homeless people with nowhere to turn.

There are several sites online that can tell you where to stay, cost and time limits. Just search RV parks in the area you are looking for. most of them cost about 45 a day but if you stay for a month you can pay as little as $350 a month. If you find a resort that needs help, and there a lot of them, you only have to pay for electricity. You have shower, laundry, swimming, club house and garbage service. These are usually included in the price. You also have internet access. Good look and be safe.
in alberta not all wallmarts have open parking lots, i was also doing some thinking is if their is a boarding house in any area, speak with the owners to see if you could rent their facilities at least their most if not all now adays have a phone,shower with washing machine and drier. most owners are polite with a small fee I’m sure they would accomdate you and the renters are normally 1 paycheck away from living on the street.

3 years ago I moved into my crown Victoria when my living g situation became too volatile. I LOVED car living. I lived in the neighborhood where I worked, taking care of a young boy with autism. It was also a fairly heavily gang-infested neighborhood. But they kept a strange eye put for me, as did the police, who also knew my situation. Then came summer, and with it, oppressive heat. I moved North to live with my Mom. She died a few months later from cancer. Long story short, I bought my first house (mobile home) last August. However, I’m disabled now by PTSD & back/neck injury & can no longer work. I’m awaiting disability approval, but in the meantime, it’s looking like I’m facing a minimum of 6 months in which I will have no way whatsoever to pay my bills (including the rent for the land upon which my trailer sits) – no income, and no help.

You will need to sleep somewhere each day, and having a plan for where you will park is helpful. It is very stressful to be driving around trying to find a place to sleep while you are tired. Boondockers are often able to park for days or weeks at a time, but urban stealth campers often need to park in a new place each night. Planning ahead ahead as much as possible makes it much less stressful when it is time to move camp.
Even with just one marine battery, this will cost you at least $200. If you don’t have that money, then get some of those durable aluminized emergency blankets sold at Amazon. They don’t tear. Use those with regular heavy blankets. They are a lot cheaper than a sleeping bag. Sleeping bags work, but you have to wash the entire thing, and the laundry cost will be very expensive. Blankets are a lot more flexible, dirt cheap at thrift stores (or free from charities), cheaper and easier to wash. just wash one, the dirty one, not all. You really want to stay clean because the vehicle is a very small space. So laundry cost is important.
You will need water to drink, cook with and wash with. I recommend you buy as large a plastic water jug / bottle / tank as you can carry and keep filling it up when you can. Sources of water are all around. Taps at petrol stations, taps in shops, parks, houses, restaurants, buildings, anywhere. I'd avoid using streams and rivers to fill water unless you have a water filter.
e. A folding, hanging shower stall and a shower bag with nozzle makes for a hot shower even in freezing cold, and one can get dry and re-dressed before even feeling cold. For a floor, a baby inflatable 1-ring mini pool makes a perfect showerpan floor and warmly cleans your feet as you shower. Otherwise, use something else to keep your feet off the ground.
There are some grocery stores that will let you park every night for months and others that wont allow one night… sometimes if you see someone parking that looks like they do it regularly you can ask them politely will anyone hastle you… sometimes this underground community can be a great rescource, if you need a jump, if the group watches out for one another. If questioned by the police dont say your just doing it once.. tell the truth and they will work with you. definately need a charged cell phone every night if you need to call 911. Being female I would try to sleep so that a person doesnt know your in the vehicle, or that your a woman(beany hat or covers pulled over your head. Have met some wonderful people who will look out for you without looking for a return… God bless and keep you
After my long hard day, I could not just go lay down and relax somewhere. I always had to wait until it got dark outside before I could go to sleep at my spot. There was no way to lay down in the back of my car while the sun was out. It was much too hot out to do that. I had to go sit in a fast food place around a bunch of strangers until it got dark.
It was in June 2013, that I unexpectedly fell ill. I felt nauseous, extremely tired, lost my appetite, had pain in the upper right side of my stomach and just felt generally unwell. I assumed that I had the flu and I figured I would feel better within a week, but this was not the case. I started to notice that the whites of my eyes weren’t so white anymore; in fact, they were looking very yellow. This prompted me to seek medical help.
×