For those six months I was able to house sit for a little bit, but still preferred sleeping in my van, and then was parked in my parents driveway for some of it. I was between where I wanted to go and jobs, but knew I always had my safe place to sleep and the necessities with me. I also parked on BLM land, and some parking lots overnight. The only expenses for that time was gas, insurance, cell phone, and food, it was awesome. I now have a house, but still refuse to give up my vehicle that can be converted in case I ever need it, it's my security blanket, if you will.
m. temperature control: Staying warm and eating a warm meal morning and evening make all the difference in colder climate winters. Summer heat, on the other hand, is best handled by well ventilated sleeping, cool baths/showers, and good hydration. There are plenty of places to stay cool during the day. n very cold weather you can preheat your sleeping bag with a bottle of hot water. By the time you need a drink, it will have cooled. In warm weather, raise your tarp sides to allow more ventilation and funnel breezes. The colder it is the more you want the tarp to morph into a cocoon shape, closing ends to stop wind or blowing precipitation. Lowering the tarp sides forms an acute angle that minimizes precip build-up on your tarp walls (and less chance for damage by heavy rain/sleet/hail). In a blizzard or heavy snow, you will wake up surprisingly warm as you end up with a lovely insulated igloo effect with natural snow walls on the lower half (at least) of your tarp cocoon. Below your hammock will be pristine ground. In the event of torrential rain, any water will be on the ground and not in your sleeping bag as you would have with tent and ground camping…I once awoke with 12″ of water under me. My feet got wet walking out but I was well above the flash flood water line and awoke dry — just rolled up the pant legs and carried my dry shoes out with me. I keep them in a zipped homemade gear-bag that hangs on the ridge line of my tarp. When car camping, secure a car cover or tarp over you in really bad weather. In addition to insulating and giving better privacy, the covering keeps your car snow/ice free and prepped for rapid travel if needed.

It’s a free country, right? Wrong. If you’ve no permission to sleep on a council or private site, police can and will ask you to move on since you are effectively trespassing. Having a large group of people in a similar situation won’t help you, either (Dale Farm, anyone). Section 61 of the Public Order Act 1994 states that police can move you on if they believe you’re trespassing on land with the common purpose of residing there for any period.
You’re funny 184 Anaheim_Ducks_Hockey. Thanks for the invitation, but I have to gracefully decline. I do have a long story behind all this but I really don’t want to get in to it. It’s so funny that you mention I should rent from an older married couple. I did, that was the last place I rented. They were in their early 50’s and she was a clepto. I didn’t realize it until I moved out and realized all my brand new clothing was gone once I got to my new place. Every pretty thing I wore she made a fuzz over how much she liked and wanted to borrow and at the ended she ended up stealing it from me.
I read your writing about living in your car. I related to you completely. I wanted to go on vacation last year and the year before and the year before that. I could never afford it. So last year I got in my car and drove to Austin and got a job right down town in the nicest office building there…and low and behold I lived in my car. I showered at the yoga place and other free shower places. After 3 months there I went to Tucson and worked for the census. Then back to California. Now I am rethinking the value of having my condo at all. For what? So here locally I am “practiciing” again living in my car. I find it is very liberating not to mention that I save about $275 a month on heating bills and $60 on water and garbage and internet maybe $40. So how much is that? About $375. So I’m going to take $39 a month and join a gym.
I live in Arizona and want to move to California. I want to save money by sleeping out of my van while in California until I find a job. My question is, how do I obtain a job if I don’t have a home address because most employers obviously want their prospective employees to fill out their home addresses in the application form. Also, can I get a job in CA with an AZ driver’s license? Because if I were to apply for a CA driver’s license, won’t they need a CA home address?

I have thought about seniors helping out seniors. At 66 one is still young compared to seniors who need help. A Foundation sponsored by a group of rich people would pair seniors who need a nice home with seniors who need help (usually after 80 or so – maybe even 90) This way old seniors could stay in their homes instead of moving to Assisted Living or Nursing Homes – Good Grief. The foundation would do the background check and a match-up survey. I have known college students who lived with seniors, but problems arose when the student wanted to stay out all night or go away for a weekend.

There are a few simple cooking methods you can use from within your car. An electric teapot will allow you to eat oatmeal, soup, and noodles. If you have a thermos, you can keep the meal warm for a long time. Some propane ovens, those meant for camping, may work in your situation, just don’t cook within the vehicle itself. If you have enough space and power, a microwave may work too.
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I decided to live in my car by choice. I take showers at the gym where I also workout and bodybuild regularly. Living in a car has changed my life in so many ways for the better. It’s peaceful, no overhead to manage and can travel freely. When it gets cold, use a sleeping bag. Get tinted windows for optimal privacy. It’s not that bad, even in a sedan, but only if you’re single. If you have pets, get rid of them. I personally don’t care for them. They’re too much maintenance. I go bar hopping on the weekends, party every day and meet new people to stay with who invite me over to stay for a while. It’s really not that bad. It’s actually quite enlightening. I’m doing this by choice and will have no plans to ever rent or own any property in the future.
Vitamin C: Living in your car is not a normal thing obviously. There is more wear and tear and hardship than if you had a place to live. So it’s important to keep your immune system up. Vitamin C boosts the immune system. Anything you can consume with a lot of Vitamin C is great. Oranges or any drinks that have vitamin C in them are great. You cannot afford to get sick in your car when you already have enough other things to worry about.
I have thought about seniors helping out seniors. At 66 one is still young compared to seniors who need help. A Foundation sponsored by a group of rich people would pair seniors who need a nice home with seniors who need help (usually after 80 or so – maybe even 90) This way old seniors could stay in their homes instead of moving to Assisted Living or Nursing Homes – Good Grief. The foundation would do the background check and a match-up survey. I have known college students who lived with seniors, but problems arose when the student wanted to stay out all night or go away for a weekend.

Spleen. The spleen is a commonly injured organ due to its position in the abdomen—under the left rib cage near the stomach. When someone suffers a blow to the abdomen, the spleen may be perforated or ruptured, leading to a large amount of internal bleeding. While treatment and recovery depend on the severity of the injury, sometimes a damaged spleen needs to be removed. Although people can live without their spleens, the lack of a spleen can compromise the immune system and put someone at risk for life-threatening infections.

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