Like others have mentioned, hammocks are at no greater risk of predator attacks than tents. The main thing that attracts animals like bears is smell. Be sure not to bring food into your shelter at night, keep clean, and set your camp 200 ft away from your kitchen area. These are some of the main ways to stay safe in bear country. Most of the time, the only kind of critter you’ll encounter are what I call “small bears”: squirrels, rodents, raccoons, etc. They are attracted to the same thing as bears, but most people don’t pay them enough attention when not in bear country and they find their bags chewed through.
With the huge increase in suitable campsites, a hammock system gives a hiking-inspired backpacker the option to hike dawn-to-dusk (or some variation thereof) without the risk of getting caught in a stretch of un-camp-able terrain. In turn, this flexibility equates to a great number of hike-able time, which ultimately equates to hiking longer distances. I believe this increase in hike-able time will typically outweigh the slight weight increase of a hammock system versus a ground system, if there even is one.
It’s a myth that hammocks are cold. Properly setup, a true backpacking hammock (with a good under-quilt) is quite warm. I’ve slept warm and comfortable in a hammock many a cold winter night in the Mid-Atlantic. The main reason for the “sleeping cold” myth is that people unaccustomed to sleeping in a hammock do not use an under-quilt or don’t adjust it properly leaving huge gaps. [Not using an under-quilt with a hammock is equivalent of someone using their sleeping bag directly on the snow without an insulating ground pad and saying that all sleeping bags are cold.]
Hammocks are fantastic for back sleepers and can be decent for side sleepers, but, for the most part, you can forget about sleeping on your stomach. Until now anyway! Enter the Warbonnet Ridgerunner, our Top Pick for Side Sleeping. It has spreader bars that help create the flattest lay possible, so flat we were able to get comfortable on both sides and even on our stomachs. It's like laying in a floating cot made out of top-of-the-line materials. The Ridgerunner also has an integrated bug net with its own cord attachment system, so it's good to go right out of the bag.
 Each and every order is very important to us and we will continue to work on getting your order out as fast as possible.  Please keep in mind that we are a small shop and do not warehouse any sewn products. What this means to you is flexibility in color combinations, American Made cottage goods but it also means that it will take a little longer to get to your door. 

One of the benefits of hammock camping, however, can also be a significant drawback. A suspended hammock allows for a cooling air flow to surround the camper in hot weather but that also makes it harder to stay warm when temperatures plummet either during the evening or seasonally as a sleeping bag will be compressed under a camper's weight, reducing its ability to trap air and provide insulation. When deciding to commit to hammock camping most "hangers" ditch their sleeping bags for down filled or synthetic quilts. The quilts are divided into two different types, top quilts (TQ) and under quilts (UQ). The UQ is suspended underneath the hammock so the weight of the hanger doesn't compress the baffles thus providing the air pockets for your body to heat and keep you warm. Concurrently the TQ is just a down blanket with some having the option or ability to make a small box for your feet. Essentially, it is just the top half of a sleeping bag. Because a sleeping bags underside is compressed it loses its insulating properties. A TQ cuts the unnecessary material to save weight and fabric. The TQ/UQ sleep system is not only warm but each quilt packs into the size of a grapefruit or smaller depending on temperature rating. Some hammocks have been designed with an extra layer of fabric,[3][4] or a series of large pockets, on the bottom. Insulating material, such as foam, quilting, aluminum windscreen reflectors,[5] clothes, or even dead leaves and brush from the campsite is stuffed between the bottom layers or inside the bottom pockets to create an insulating buffer between the camper and the cold outside air. While the above solutions, except for the found materials, add weight and bulk to the hammock, some approaches use an ultralight open cell foam with a mylar space blanket to mitigate this increase in weight. Another drawback is that a camping hammock requires two trees close enough to hang it and strong enough to support the sleeper's weight. This can be a limitation depending on what environment a person is camping in and at higher elevations where trees are more sparse. In these situations hammock campers may bring along a light groundsheet and "go to ground" using their hammock as a ground tent.

But my favorite option is hammock underquilt – especially from the guys at Hammock Gear. From a weight to warmth ratio perspective, there’s no beating a down underquilt. I find that the incubator 20 isn’t too warm for autumn nights and is actually rated conservatively. I’ve taken it down into the teens before. But that will also depend from person to person. The one downside to an underquilt is if you get stuck without trees, you can’t use it for bottom insulation. By laying directly on the underquilt on the ground, you compress the down and that takes away any insulation.
Honestly, the comfort is the number one reason to switch and can't be emphasized enough. It is way more comfortable than any pad out there including the self inflating pads. Besides supporting you back, relaxing your body, and reducing foot swelling, there is the gentle rocking that can lull you to sleep, as well as the lack of mystery bumps like rocks and roots that you think are not there until you lay down to sleep like there is sleeping on the ground. You don't slide to one end of your hammock like sometimes happens in your tent when you can't find the perfect level spot.
When you have a hammock, your campsites are limited by imagination. All you need is a couple of trees the right distance apart. What is under you may not matter at all. I have personally slept on the side of a mountain, and on the Hennessy web site, there is even a photo of a guy sleeping over his boat in a swamp. There are things that make better camps than others, and some safety things to consider, but unless you are camping where there are no trees, then the hammock will increase your camp sites.
In locations with ample trees of sufficient strength, the primary advantage of hammock systems is the huge increase in suitable campsites. In Shenandoah National Park, for example, most of the terrain is rocky and steeply sloping; the number areas suitable for ground camping (i.e. flat; and free of rocks, roots, and vegetation) is very limited. Moreover, many of these areas have developed into crowded, heavily impacted campsites.
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Alison hammock camping cold weather. And with a solid top cover hammock like this Dutchware Chameleon you can skip the weight and complexity of a tarp. I’ve comfortably slept down to around 10° F in a 3 lb (1.3 kg) hammock setup (hammock, top quilt, under quilt, tarp and suspension). That’s way lighter than most tent, sleeping bag, ground pad setups! [Note: a +20 under-quilt is not in the picture to better show the hammock body details.]
Thanks for the info on hammock pads. I am about ready to pull the trigger on a Chameleon Hammock and was wondering if I would notice much difference in the lay between 1.0 and 1.6 Hexon fabric. Also, I see 1.6 comes in argon and Hexon, andy reason to go with one over the other. I am around 160lbs so i could get away fine with 1.0 but was wondering if there is any comfort gain going with a heavier fabric.
The best kind are styles that are designed to fit inside the sleeping bag such as the Kylmit Inertia X Frame. One of the biggest annoyances when trying to use a sleeping pad with a hammock is staying on top of the pad. It’s easy to shift your weight and move the sleeping pad from out underneath you. Some hammocks feature two layers to hold sleeping pads in place. Other hammockers like to stuff their pad inside their sleeping bag as long as it fits.
These days it seems like there are 100s of companies making backpacking hammocks. The number of options can be overwhelming. Many of them make great hammocks, but we want to avoid cheap knock offs that use inferior materials and construction. We look for a few important markers of quality when selecting a hammock. First, we examine the seems to make sure they are triple stitched for strength, durability, and safety. Second, we look at the the weight the hammock is rated to safely support. Third, if we are going to be backpacking or hiking with the hammock we look at how much it weighs, more expensive fabrics will be light weight, durable and very strong. Fourth, we look at reviews online and from trusted blogs and outdoor publications. And lastly, we look at cost and value. For example does the hammock include the straps for hanging or do those cost extra (more on tree straps next). 
You can also tie your hammock into a makeshift backpack to carry any survival items you come across. Your tree straps are also useful to have. Use them to fasten branches together into an emergency raft. The large hammock can form a makeshift sail to increase how far your raft can take you. Get creative, there’s unlimited ways to put your hammock to use.
Hammocks are not for everyone, but they can provide the ultimate sleep and relaxation experience for many outdoor enthusiasts. In addition to the novelty of floating above the ground and not having to find a flat spot as you do with a tent, they are often the most compact and lightweight sleeping option and can negate the need for an expensive sleeping pad. We hope this review helped you narrow down the options and get closer to your perfect choice. For more information on making the right purchase, check out our Buying Advice article.
The area I refer to is a stretch of quite mountainous terrain along the eastern edge of the country. The parks have some large buck and antelope,which are the animals the poachers are after primarily for subsistence purposes, rather than commercial gain (as awful as that is). There is no doubt that some are quite desperate, and an encounter is unwelcome.
Tip #3: Look for an established (pre-existing) campsite to set up your hammock. Per Leave No Trace principles: “Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site is not necessary.” Large hammocking groups should split into smaller groups to prevent unnecessary disturbance. Leave No Trace advises: “Keep campsites small. Focus activity in areas where vegetation is absent.”
You may want to consider bringing a small gas burner on your next winter hammock camping trip. Make sure to use fuel that is not frozen or problematic in cold weather. Gasoline fuels are generally not affected by temperature or pressure, so they can be used reliably. Since the boiling point of gas is 0.5 degrees Celsius below zero, the flames drop sharply, it is advisable to use a gasoline fuel source that produces a constant fire regardless of the temperature during winter camping. Also, It is the  best way to prepare for accidents by separating gas lanterns and burners from the fuel tank. Since safety accidents such as suffocation, burns, and other incidents can occur at the campsite, you should always be careful when using heating equipment. It is not recommended to have an open flame burner in a SHEL hammock tent because of the movement in the air.
BUYING ONLINE - Check the seller's return policy before you buy, but you can almost always return an unused hammock within a certain time frame after purchasing. We recommend buying your top choice, testing it at home, and returning or exchanging if it doesn’t feel quite right. We've been buying lightweight hammocks online for years and we've yet to have any problems.

I am new to Hammock camping and am in the market for one now. I Rock Climb, Hike, and Camp quite a bit during the summer, being that i live in Sacramento everything is just a few hours away. I’m doin a trip to Loon Lake with some friends at the end of June, and am looking to get the Hennessy Hammock “SCOUT” and cannot seem to find many reviews and information as far as tips n tricks. I have been doing extensive research all week and plan to continue. I am aware that this is the lowest model but would like to know if it is worth it or go a different company or higher quality. But being that i am just starting this hammock awesomeness i was looking to be a little bit cheap and upgrade as i go. Sorry for the paragraph, Im a n00b!

In other cases, your hammock equipment might be used in order to hang your hammock outdoors in your garden. In this case, it might include a nail and a hook, or perhaps carabiners for hanging on a hammock stand. We’ve reviewed two sets of carabiners, both of which are very effective at holding huge amounts of weight without taking up too much space in your bag!
I’m a proponent of using square surface inches. I know you’re trying to keep your analysis to less than novel length and we can debate this stuff all day, but you’ve sort of nailed us for our smallest, narrowest hammock (despite larger options) and you’ve categorized it next to a 9 foot by four foot hammock when ours is 11 feet by four feet, four inches. The numbers: 5,184 square surface inches for the GT Nano 7 compared to 6,864 inches for the BIAS WWM in its smallest incarnation which means the BIAS is almost ONE THIRD larger.
Put your pad inside your sleeping bag. This helps keep things from moving around, and helps the bag from bunching a little. It’s not a perfect system because you do have a lot of material under you that can bunch up. Laying the bag open and sitting in the middle before you get in helps. I’ll admit that with a sleep my bag you will need to do some maneuvering to get situated at first. This is why under quilts are so much beloved. They are less fussy. But pads and bags can do the job of keeping you warm, you just have to work a little more.

The reasons to hammock are not always clear to people that have never tried one. Often I get comments about how a person hates sleeping on their back or can only sleep on their side, or how sleeping with that curve will wreck their back, or even how they don't want to damage trees with the cords. All these are valid concerns, yet each are simply the worries of the uninformed, similar to family fears we hikers are all in danger of getting eaten by bears daily.
With greater campsite availability, I can get away from habituated camping areas to find peace and quiet, and a better night of rest. Hammocks are a blessing to those that do not desire the crowded social scene at most Appalachian Trail (AT) shelters and other popular camping areas. And when better campsites exist — more aesthetic, more protected, less buggy, etc. — I can utilize them.
You can also tie your hammock into a makeshift backpack to carry any survival items you come across. Your tree straps are also useful to have. Use them to fasten branches together into an emergency raft. The large hammock can form a makeshift sail to increase how far your raft can take you. Get creative, there’s unlimited ways to put your hammock to use.

Keep in mind that this contender is so thin that it's see-through. The dimensions are small and will be tight for anyone taller than about 5'10" or for broad-shouldered folk. You also can't get a comfortable diagonal lay, so if sleeping on your side is a necessity, you'll want to go for a roomier hang that weighs more. But for the right-sized individual who wants to be as light as humanly possible, this model is a solid winner.
Some people think using an underquilt during the summer is overkill. But as long as you’re not using a 0 degree rated quilt, you should be ok using that in the summer. As a huge bonus, you might not even need a sleeping bag or top quilt! In warmer temperatures, the micro climate your underquilt creates can be enough to keep you warm through the night. Learn how to make an inexpensive summer underquilt.
CHOOSING  STOCK MODELS:  All "Stock" Hennessy Hammocks are a complete shelter system including tightly woven fabrics and high quality support ropes, a matching detachable rainfly, a "no see um" mosquito mesh, a gear loft on the ridge line and a stuff sack with set up instructions on the back. Hennessy Hammock also provides complimentary "Tree Hugger" webbing straps to protect the rope and the tender bark of trees.
When you’re lost, you might find yourself stranded in a place where there are no trees for your hammock. In this case, your hammock can be your impromptu bivvy and provide some protection from the elements. Crawl into the hammock on the ground and wrap the sides around you. This might not be the most comfortable, but it’s better than no protection.
Just finished up day 4 on our JMT thru-hike!! The weather has been lovely, our packs are feeling good, and we’re very excited for what lies ahead. At the moment we’re chillin at Red’s Meadow on mile 60 of the trail. Eating some good food and enjoying a cold brewski. About 160 miles left in our journey, which we’re expecting will take about 12-13 more days. Hope all is well in your world!! . #jmt2018 #johnmuirtrail

For the seasoned hammock camper, the ultimate form of insulation comes from an under quilt-top quilt combo. Under quilts provide an insulating layer beneath your hammock that you hang on the outer layer. Since the under quilt is on the outside, it can expand and provide a ton of insulating surface area. And it won’t compress when you lay in your hammock. The camper then uses the top quilt as a blanket while the under quilt keeps his bottom warm. When used together, a top quilt and under quilt function like a sleeping bag around the whole hammock. The only downside is the high price tag attached to purchasing a top quilt and an under quilt.
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